OCC Study - Gulag-Blog - <-- gulag-online --> Bouldern and Clean Climbing in Elbsandstone

Go to content

Main menu:

OCC Study

Published by in CClimbing ·
Study „Climbing perspectives in the Elbsandstein“ – Interview with Sven Scholz, 26th of April 2017


Subject: Clean climbing in Saxon Sandstone, Elbsandstein
Personal details:
Sven Scholz, born 1973, grew up in Pirna, is a regional protagonist of progressive climbing like bouldering and clean climbing in the Elbsandstein, Saxony.
He started climbing at the age of 14  and became within a few years one of Saxony’s top climbers. He succeeded in repeating the hardest route at that time (Perestroika XIa, 1990) pushing the limits with first ascents (Good-bye and Amen XIb, 1992). Together with his brother Michael he travelled all over the bouldering venues in Europe (e.g. establishing a whole new area with more than a hundred boulder problems at Gwenver, Cornwall) and developed the probably most distant boulder venue “Bouldergonia” at the foot of the Fitz Roy range, Patagonia. Always looking for new lines his focus is on bouldering (Hintermland 8c, 2003; Krieg 8c, 2013) and clean climbing (Fuck Reloaded, 2011; Newt On, 2013; both E9/7a). Since 2003 Sven has been working as an independent climbing guide, and he has been working together with Bergsport Arnold since 1993.

Question:

Could you explain to me, what clean climbing does mean?

Sven Scholz:

Clean climbing means to leave as little footprints on the rock as possible, and to climb a line without fixed protection like bolts or pitons.

Question:

How do you protect yourself when clean climbing?

Sven Scholz:

We only use removable means of protection. It is the conscientious decision to refrain from the use of fixed protection like bolts or pitons on the rock. That does mean that the removable protection depends on the rock structure. The easier the route the better is the protection; the harder the route the less protection is possible.

Question:

What is the contrast of clean climbing to trad-climbing?

Sven Scholz:

In trad you place the means of protection when leading with the second removing them. That is the traditional way. When climbing clean, protection can be placed before actually climbing the route. This is an advantage, especially when the protection is quite difficult to place. It may also, in an extremely difficult route, be possible to place protection only after a move or even not at all, if a crucial handhold is also the only place for protection. This mode of protection makes clean climbing so exciting.  In most cases the routes in high grades are only repeated once, as the demands on your psyche increase drastically. Hence the respective projects are always singular.

Question:

What protection is used in clean climbing?

Sven Scholz:

The whole variety of cams and nuts, slings, threats.

Question:

Does the protection damage the surface or structure of the rock?

Sven Scholz:

The damage is minimal, comparable to that caused by your hands and feet. In clean climbing the focus is on good rock quality. As you do not climb the free-standing towers but massifs, which make up 98 percent of the rock in the Elbsandstein, walls with perfectly solid rock can be chosen. In contrast to this and due to the traditional rules of Saxon climbing, many routes follow poor rock - the rules restrict the climbing to towers thus reducing the climbable rock to 2 percent. Heavy tear and wear of the rock  are the unavoidable result. To fight these consequences 3 tons of sandstone hardener (3000 litres)1has been used in the National Park. This puts into question the so-called clean way of Saxon climbing.

Question:

Where there any attempts to change the way of climbing in the Elbsandstein before you started with clean climbing?

Sven Scholz:

In the seventies there were first thoughts of using camming devices as protection2 as well as chalk for better grip in the Elbsandstein. In 1978 cams were tested - with positive results holding falls3.
1980 a decisive decision was taken against cams and nuts4; they should not be used – “for shit”5! Dietrich Hasse noted 1977 in a critique of this decision against modern protection in Saxon sandstone: “When climbing, due to ignoring such imperative prerequisites, degenerates into playing with life, then this is synonymous with antisocial behaviour.”6 In the seventies the GDR climbing community was to be confronted with international trends. In 1976, Fritz Wiessner (a Saxon climber who emigrated to the USA in 1929) took some of the young American climbing elite to Saxony – Henry Barber, Rick Hatch and Steve Wunsch. In memory of Wiessner, Bernd Arnold wrote that due to this visit the change of attitudes was more with the so very often self-satisfied Saxon climbers7. Whereas for the Americans, completely familiar with mobile protection devices, knots and slings were a sheer addition to their array of protection, the Saxon climbers got to know the new way of climbing without resting and belaying the second on rings and without the traditional use of a pyramid of human bodies to overcome “unclimbable” rock. If you can’t manage without resting on rings, then you have to abseil. The new style of climbing was without compromise (and was later named “redpoint” by Kurt Albert).
There were also top climbers from Western Germany visiting. Kurt Albert, Wolfgang Fietz, Wolfgang Güllich and Stefan Glowacz repeated the hardest routes in the Elbsandstein. This influenced the rise of a more athletic mode of climbing in Saxony. The first climbing competitions started, first techno-routes were established, more extreme first ascents were made, and occasionally there were routes climbed on massifs.
 \t \t \t \t   

Question:

What changed with the political developments and reunification 1989/90?

Sven Scholz:

The political changes were combined with the hope of freedom in terms of climbing, which meant well protected routes and first ascents on massifs. But the establishment of the National Park made this impossible. Confronted with the threat of a complete climbing ban and the argument of rock protection the SBB (Saxon Mountaineering Association) came to terms with the status quo of the Saxon climbing rules resulting in their transformation into law. From this point onwards acting against them was to be prosecuted by the legal authorities. Climbing rules enforced by the state – this is unparalleled in the whole world! Another reason for the revival of the Saxon climbing tradition after 1990 is the emphasis on performance in GDR sport, represented by the DBWO (German Association for Hiking, Mountaineering and Orientation). The result: elimination of technical routes and sports routes. This marks the end of a more open development of climbing in the Elbsandstein for the time being.

Question:

How did the idea of clean climbing in the Elbsandstein come about?

Sven Scholz:

We found new possibilities to live our idea of sportily ambitious bouldering in areas outside the boundaries of the National Park, the Bahratal and near the  Am Breiten Stein. As early as 1987, the first boulders were developed at the Schwarz&Weiß-Block (Black and White Boulder) as a means of training for climbing. Ben Moon and Jerry Moffatt who achieved extreme routes in sport climbing and lines in bouldering, inspired and motivated us to do the same in the Elbsandstein. During a visit to England in 1995 we experienced the productive and friendly coexistence of bouldering and clean climbing. We developed the idea to introduce clean climbing as extension of bouldering in the Elbsandstein as well as to re-establish old sport climbing routes, which were originally equipped with bolts. Thus the label “Reloaded” was born.

Question:

What actually is the difference between clean climbing and Saxon climbing?

Sven Scholz:

In Saxon climbing an AF-ascent (all free ascent, but with rest on rings or bolts) is fully accepted, and protection gets better with increasing grades. In clean climbing only redpoint or pinkpoint are fully acceptable, and protection becomes worse with increasing grades. This implies that mental challenges are added to the physical ones.

Question:

What is the sports performance aspect for you in clean climbing?

Sven Scholz:

Clean climbing has clear-cut rules. Only redpoint counts, and the more extreme the route the more mentally demanding it is. This is rigorous and without compromise.

Question:

Which for you are the biggest contradictions in Saxon climbing?

Sven Scholz:

The lack of sportsmanship. To see resting on the ring as equivalent with the complete free ascent of a route - or even higher ranking. In addition, the reduction of the distance between the rings in routes with increasing difficulties. The hypocracy in dealing with the tradition including later addition of rings or abseil bolts as well as the inconsistency in implementing the rules. Last but not least the silence about the common attitude of first ascents where the rings are placed by abseiling from the top.

Question:

What is causing the biggest conflicts of clean climbing with Saxon climbing?

Sven Scholz:

The prohibition to exercise other styles of climbing than according to the rules of Saxon climbing in the National Park and the nature protections zones. The practice of clean climbing is forbidden by the Saxon National Park Law. This concerns the use of cams, the climbing at massifs and the use of chalk. The law nature of the Saxon climbing rules is responsible for the biggest potential for conflicts. It hampers the free development of climbing in the Elbsandstein and destroys perspectives for the younger generation of Saxon climbers. The conflict about clean climbing is more between the National Park and less between the Saxon Mountaineering Association SBB. Ignorance dominates under the pretext of nature protection. Everything must bow to the nature protectionism.
The main objective of clean climbing in the Elbsandstein is not changing existing routes on the sandstone towers. It is the opening-up and development of the vast climbing potential on the massifs.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(1) Pit Schubert, Sicherheit und Risiko in Fels und Eis, Bd. 3, S . 21.

(2) Der Artikel „Ergebnisse und Test mit Klemmkeilen“ von Volker Kind aus dem Jahr 1980 gibt einen kurzen Überblick zu Positionen und Argumenten sowie veröffentlichen Stellungnahmen in der damaligen Diskussion – Mitteilungsblatt des DWBO Wandern und Bergsteigen 1980/ Nr. 4,
(www.bergsteigerbund.de/dokumente/ufo/WuB_1980-4.pdf).

(3) Im selbigen Artikel „Ergebnisse und Test mit Klemmkeilen von Volker Kind (Wandern und Bergsteigen, 1980/4, (www.bergsteigerbund.de/dokumente/ufo/WuB_1980-4.pdf) erfolgt eine Zusammenfassung der Test von Klemmkeile in der praktischen Anwendung sowie deren Ergebnisse. Kind benennt erste vergleichende Sturzversuche (Klemmkeile und Schlingen) am 18.6.1978 und deren Ergebnisse sowie folgende vom 11.-13.6.1979. Außerdem berichtet er vom praktischen Testlauf und dessen Ergebnissen in der Klettersaison 1979, welcher auf einen Vorschlag an das ZFK Felsklettern aus einem Diskussionsabend vom 31.10.1978 zurückgeht.

(4) Rudolf Zirnstein fasst in einem Beitrag des Mitteilungsblatt des DWBO Wandern und Bergsteigen aus dem Jahr 1980 die Inhalte wie Ergebnisse einer Beratung zum Thema der Klemmkeileinführung vom 28.03.1980 zusammen. Die Argumente der Diskussion über Langzeitwirkungen, physikalische Fakten, praktische Unwägbarkeiten und der Sicherheitsaspekt werden darin einzeln aufgeführt. Wobei anzumerken ist, dass ein erheblicher Anteil seiner Ausführungen den Argumenten gegen eine Einführung der Klemmkeile vorbehalten bleibt. Weiterhin führt Zirnstein die Ergebnisse einer abschließenden Abstimmung der Beratung auf, die unter namentlicher (!) Nennung der Befürworter zur Entscheidung kommt, das vorläufige Klemmkeilverbot für das Kletterjahr 1980 nicht aufzuheben und stellt zudem ein generelles Verbot in Aussicht. Abschließend ordnet Zirnstein das mutmaßlich generelle Verbot von Klemmkeilen in eine sächsische Tradition des Verzichts entgegen modernen Strömungen ein. Die Argumente für eine Erhöhung der Sicherheit kontert er mit dem Konzept des Einbringens nachträglicher Ringe und verweist in diesem Zusammenhang auf das Gebot des Rotpunktstils. Zuletzt definiert er Klemmkeile und Magnesia als "unerlaubte Hilfsmittel“ und fordert den „Mut“ der Sportfreunde deren Nichtanwendung bei Mißachtung durchzusetzen - vgl. Rudolf Zirnstein in Wandern und Bergsteigen 1980/ Nr. 6, (www.bergsteigerbund.de/dokumente/ufo/WuB_1980-6.pdf). Im Alpinismus (1980/ Nr. 11, www.bergsteigerbund.de/dokumente/ufo/Alpinismus_1980-11.pdf) erfolgte durch den Abteilungsleiter des Bezirksschutzorgan, Oberlandforstmeister Behnisch, die Bekanntmachung als staatrechtliches Verbot durch den Rat des Bezirkes Dresden.

(5) Sven Scholz bezieht sich hier auf die Ausführungen von Dietrich Hasse: „Das Beharren auf starr
festgeschriebenen Sicherungsbräuchen, das Festhalten an den alten, vielfach unzulänglichen Sicherungsmitteln und Methoden, obgleich es Beßres gibt, scheint mir seinen Preis nicht wert: weder ein einziges, geschweige denn mehr als ein Menschenleben, die völlig unsinnig für einen imaginären alten Zopf vergeudet werden. Da gibt es Kletterwege im sächsischen Sandstein, die fast keine oder überhaupt keine Sicherungsmöglichkeit mit klassischen Mitteln (Sicherungsringe, Sicherungsschlingen) bieten. Klemmkeile hingegen ließen sich unterbringen, hinreichend, um gute oder wenigstens halbwegs vertretbare Sicherung zu schaffen. Sie würden hier eine echte Sicherungslücke schließen. Doch auf dem Keil liegt der Bannstrahl des Verbotes, er soll ‚ums Verrecken‘ (im wahren Sinne des Wortes) nicht benutzt werden dürfen.“ - vgl. dazu Dietrich Hasse, „Klemmkeile im sächsischen Sandstein – ein Sakrileg? Gegenüberstellung zweier gegensätzlicher Meinungen“ in: Alpinismus 1978-5, (www.bergsteigerbund.de/dokumente/ufo/Alpinismus_1978-5.pdf).

(6) An dieser Stelle zitierte Sven Scholz aus einem Artikel von Dietrich Hasse in der Zeitschrift Alpinismus, der folgende Ausführungen voranstellt, jedoch stammt dieser aus dem Jahr 1978: „Wer wollte im Ernst sagen, daß es auf sportlichem Gebiet erstrebenswerte Ziele gibt, die schwerer wiegen als menschliches Leben? Zu einer Zeit, da die Lebenskraft des einzelnen in seinem eigenen wie im Interesse aller, der Gesellschaft, größten Stellenwert besitzt, kommt mir ein Bergsteigen, dessen höchste Zielvorstellung, konsequent weitergedacht, der ungesicherte Alleingang ist, wie ein Griff in die Mottenkiste vor. […] Welche allgemeingültige Funktion kommt dem Bergsteigen denn in erster Linie zu? Als Freizeitsport soll es unsere Lebensfreude erhöhen, uns bewußter leben, leistungsfähiger und leistungsfreudiger machen. Daß bergsportliches Können, Trainingsstand und Form bei jeder Tourenwahl gewissenhaft bedacht sein wollen, ist eine Binsenweisheit. Wo das Klettern durch Nichtbeachten von so unerläßlichen Voraussetzungen zum Spiel mit dem Leben ausartet, bedeutet das ein selbstverschuldetes Abgleiten in Asoziale.“ – vgl. Dietrich Hasse, „Klemmkeile im sächsischen Sandstein – ein Sakrileg? Gegenüberstellung zweier gegensätzlicher Meinungen“ in: Alpinismus 1978-5, (www.bergsteigerbund.de/dokumente/ufo/Alpinismus_1978-5.pdf).

(7) Unter dem Absatz zum 17.05.1976 findet sich folgende Ausführung: „ Seit gestern sind sie in Dresden: Henry Barber (22), Rick Hatch (22) und Steve Wusch (21). […] Überhaupt war eine große Umstellung ihrerseits nicht erforderlich. Sandstein – nichts Neues. Mobile Sicherungsmittel – hinreichend bekannt, deshalb war die Knotenschlinge nur eine Ergänzung des Repertoires. Umstellen mußten eher wir uns, die so oft selbstgefälligen Sachsen, denn der von Amerikanern kreierte Kletterstil war kompromißlos. Für das typisch sächsische Rasten und nachholen an Sicherungsringen und die traditionelle Baustelle, alles sportliche Wertminderungen, war da kein Platz. […] Klettern ohne ‚Rast und Ruh‘, heute als Rotpunkt (RP – von Kurt Albert kreiert) bezeichnet, wurde von ihnen schon damals konsequent praktiziert.“ – vgl. Bernd Arnold: „ Brücken schlagen“ in: Gedenkbuch Fritz Wiessner. 1900-1988, Sächsischer Bergsteigerbund (Hg.), Dresden: Union Druckerei 2000, S. 85-90.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Written form of the interview with Sven Scholz on 26/02/2017 by Hanka Owsian




Copyright _ gulag - online _ 2005 - 2017 _ All rights reserved
Back to content | Back to main menu